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Genomics plays a vital role in driving Québec's economic future. That is why Génome Québec aims at advancing knowledge in genomics by funding major research projects. In this section, you will discover all the latest achievements in the field of genomics.

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Genetic discovery in Montreal for a rare disease in Newfoundland

Sept. 11, 2012

Researchers from the Guy Rouleau Laboratory affiliated with the CHUM Research Centre and the CHU–Sainte-Justine Research Centre have discovered the genetic cause of a rare disease reported only in patients originating from Newfoundland: hereditary spastic ataxia (HSA).

 


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ENCODE: Your DNA as you've never imagined

Sept. 7, 2012

DNA is much more complex than researchers had believed it in the early 2000s. Since 2003, some 450 researchers from more than thirty laboratories based in different countries (mainly USA, Europe and Asia) worked on the ENCODE project (Encyclopedia of DNA Elements) : Scientists have identified each DNA sequence and analyzed their function.


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GenoRem at the 9th International Phyto Society Conference

Sept. 6, 2012

Michel Labrecque and Al. will present the GenoRem project : Environmental genomics of willows and microorganisms applied to the decontamination of abandoned industrial sites, at the 9th International Phyto Society Conference hosted by the Hasselt University in Belgium from September 11th to 14th, 2012.

 

For more information: http://www.uhasselt.be/Phytotechnologies


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Genome Brings Ancient Girl to Life

Sept. 6, 2012

In a stunning technical feat, an international team of scientists has sequenced the genome of an archaic Siberian girl 31 times over, using a new method that amplifies single strands of DNA. The sequencing is so complete that researchers have as sharp a picture of this ancient genome as they would of a living person's, revealing, for example that the girl had brown eyes, hair, and skin. "No one thought we would have an archaic human genome of such quality," says Matthias Meyer, a postdoc at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany. "Everyone was shocked by the counts. That includes me."

To learn more:

http://news.sciencemag.org/sciencenow/2012/08/genome-brings-ancient-girl-to-li.html


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Vitamin B12 deficiency: tracking the genetic causes

Aug. 28, 2012

Vitamin B12 is essential to human health. However, some people have inherited conditions that leave them unable to process vitamin B12. As a result they are prone to serious health problems, including developmental delay, psychosis, stroke and dementia. An international research team recently discovered a new genetic disease related to vitamin B12 deficiency by identifying a gene that is vital to the transport of vitamin into the cells of the body. This discovery will help doctors better diagnose this rare genetic disorder and open the door to new treatments. The findings are published in the journal Nature Genetics.


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How timber detectives use DNA tests to track the trade in stolen wood

Aug. 22, 2012

Call it CSI: Singapore. But unlike the Crime Scene Investigators from the popular TV series, these detectives are hired to look for evidence of rogue wood from stores increasingly worried about being duped by a global trade in illegal timber now worth billions.

 

They take wood samples into their lab and put them through DNA tests that can pinpoint the species and origin of a piece of timber. They also track timber and timber products from forest to shop to ensure clients’ shipments are legal.

 

“This is like CSI meets save the planet,” said Jonathan Geach, executive director of Double Helix Tracking Technologies, the Singapore company that has developed and commercialized DNA testing for wood, the only firm in the world to do so.

 

Every two seconds, an area of forest the size of a football field is clear-cut by illegal loggers, the World Bank says in a recent study. Annually, such illegally cleared land is equivalent to the size of Ireland.

 

Read the article


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Coordinated protein breakdown and synthesis: a key to healthy growth of cells

Aug. 21, 2012

A team of researchers led by Prof. Barry Posner of McGill University’s Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism have now, for the first time, been able to show that in order to assure the ongoing supply of amino acids needed for new protein synthesis, growth factors also stimulate a coordinated or regulated increase in protein breakdown within cells to generate free amino acids.


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Congratulations to Philip Awadalla who received the 2012 Joe Doupe Young Investigator Award

Aug. 8, 2012

Philip Awadalla, Scientific Director of CARTaGENE, received the 2012 Joe-Doupe Young Investigator Award from the Canadian Society for Clinical Investigation.


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Canadian Trends in Genomics

Aug. 3, 2012

We invite you to read Biotechnology Focus article on Genomics Trends in Canada. A shift has recently begun to unfold in genomics. After a decade of basic research and discoveries, emphasis is now being placed on innovation in applied research, a phenomenon that is evident throughout the Western world.


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Researchers find genetic cause for body tremors

Aug. 3, 2012

Researchers at the University of Montreal and its affiliated CHU Sainte-Justine and CHUM hospitals have linked some cases of Essential Tremor (ET) to a specific genetic problem.


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